CATEGORY: WOMEN

I believe, you see, in the dream.... There’s a lot to say about Diana Vreeland. As the former editor-in-chief of Vogue from 1963 until 1971, founder of the Met Costume Ball and style icon, she changed the idea of not just fashion, but individuality. With nothing but a dream, she rose to prominence without formal education or beauty. She didn't need either, however, because she was Diana Vreeland. Fantasy to Mrs. Vreeland, sometimes, is applied to her in a derogatory sense, that the fantasy eclipses the reality, the authority, the academic. And I think that this view is wrong. The fantasy to Mrs. Vreeland is like a pulse, because when she felt the pulse, it kept everything alive for her. — ‘The eye needs to travel’, Diana Vreeland Unimpressed by tren...

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Martha Gellhorn was an American novelist, travel writer, and journalist, who is now considered one of the greatest war correspondents of the 20th century. She reported on virtually every major world conflict that took place during her 60-year career. Gellhorn was also the third wife of American novelist Ernest Hemingway, from 1940 to 1945. At the age of 89, ill and almost completely blind, she died in 1998 in an apparent suicide. The Martha Gellhorn Prize for Journalism is named after her. Gellhorn graduated in 1926 from John Burroughs School in St. Louis, and enrolled in Bryn Mawr College in Philadelphia. In 1927, she left before graduating to pursue a career as a journalist. Her first published articles appeared in The New Republic. In 1930, determined ...

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Hilda Terry was a cartoonist mostly known for 'Teena', a comic strip about a teenage girl that ran for 20 years in American newspapers. She was the first woman allowed to join the National Cartoonists Society in 1950 and became a pioneer in early computer animation. Born in 1914, Terry was raised in Newburyport, Massachusetts. She recalls being discriminated against her family and even assaulted them for being Jews. After leaving school at age 14, she worked in a local factory, soldering radio components. But she had ambitions of being a cartoonist and came to New York, where she found work as a waitress at Schrafft's on Times Square. She studied art at the National Academy of Design and the Art Students League, where one of her teachers was D'Alessio....

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