ARTICLES

You've seen Liz Plank before. If you watch the news, you've seen her as a correspondent, representative or expert speaking on behalf of women across the nation. If you don't watch the news, you've seen her on Divided States of Women. The journalist, producer and political correspondent at Vox is now the host of the new show 'Divided States of Women' -- a community that aims to disrupt the idea that there is a uni-dimensional female perspective. The series digs into controversial issues that affect every woman in America, uncovering an array of opinions and stories through unfiltered conversations and playful social experiments. From breaking down new laws to economic facts on tampons, Plank has become our number one source for unfiltered news in a w...

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I exist within the vibrations of the world. Your vibration is your energy. If all things in life are connected, then your vibration is your ability to attract the things you want and the things that are meant to for you. The Law of Attraction states that by focusing on positive or negative thoughts people can bring positive or negative experiences into their life. Your vibration is what attracts things to you. It's what causes things to notice and find you. When your vibration is high, you are emitting a frequency that is towards your goals in life. When you feel stressed out, frustrated, exhausted, depleted, irritated…chances are you are filled with “resistance”. Resistance is the energetic sludge that holds you stuck in a place you don’t want to b...

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You know Yayoi Kusama, you just don’t realize it. Born in 1929 in Matsumoto City, Japan, Kusama dreamed of being an artist since the day she painted flowers in a sketchpad, the same sketchpad her mother would tear up and tell her to stop drawing in. Born to a traditional Japanese family, she was expected to marry into a good family-- nothing more, nothing less. Her ideas of leaving Japan to become a professional painter were out of the question. In 1957 she left for New York, officially disowned by her family. Kusama recalls, “My mother beat me and kicked me on the derriere every day, irritated that I was always painting…When I left for New York, my mother gave me $1,000,000 yen and told me never to set foot in her house again.” Filled with a ...

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